Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
×

More from DeviantArt



Details

Submitted on
February 4, 2014
Link
Thumb

Stats

Views
4,143 (1 today)
Favourites
2 (who?)
Comments
29
×
Today is the rollout of hard SF author Allen’s Steele’s latest novel, “V-S-Day”. It’s a novel of alternate history, set during WW2, which examines the “what-if” of Hitler giving the go ahead for the Sanger-designed “Silbervogel” (Silverbird) sub-orbital space bomber. This proposal was very real, only it never got the green light – in our time line. In Allen’s story Werner Von Braun is shifted from his work on the V-2 to coordinate the Silbervogel project. The allies catch wind of the plan and fight it the only way that they can think how: to use their own, home grown rocket scientist, Robert Goddard, to create an interceptor. And the race is on.

Sanger Amerika Bomber by shelbs2

Allen spent time in both Germany and in Robert Goddard’s Worcester, Mass. lab investigating the stories details, as well as doing research on the aeronautics and consulting with friends at NASA on specific details of implementing the technology. The book is an expansion of his older short story, “Goddard’s People” and uses material generated for the aborted screenplay for the movie.  Ron Miller generated partial story boards for the movie effort (you can see some on Allen's FB page: www.facebook.com/Allensteelesf… ) and provides some vehicular tech illustrations for the book. And this book is my first in the role of Allen’s “first reader” – a sort of content editor position.

Birth of Rocketry by VisualMotionMedia

The book’s available in hardcover, Audible, and Kindle formats:

HC: www.amazon.com/V-S-Day-Novel-A…
Kindle: www.amazon.com/V-S-Day-Novel-A…
Audible: www.amazon.com/V-S-Day-Novel-A…
  • Mood: Relief
  • Listening to: Bagel Radio
  • Reading: The Quantum Thief
Add a Comment:
 
:iconwilliam-black:
William-Black Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
This looks like a great read. Apparently Scott Lowther Aerospace Projects Review produced the diagram of Sanger’s Silverbird for the book. Scotts work, along with artist Ron Miller’s work, who produced the diagram of the US military’s response, are featured in the book. Story here: Unwanted Blog.
Reply
:icondana-redde:
dana-redde Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, Robert Goddard! I used to drive by that little rocket statue all the time.

Semi-related: David Clark Co. did work for the space program back in the 60's. My grandpa used to work there, and there's a photo of my dad as a young boy meeting some of the astronauts.
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2014  Professional General Artist
NEAT! I think almost every manufacturer in the US was touched by the space program in some way, back then... or so it seems. Maybe that's why we can't get back to the Moon: we off-shored too much of the industry that got us there the first time??! ;p
Reply
:iconmaster-ninjabear:
master-ninjabear Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Glad the Nazi war machine was destroyed, and I've got my own books to peddle.
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Peddle those books, man! Peddle like the wind!

Me.... I ain't makin' a cent off this one. It's the first book of his in a while that I didn't having a role in. I hope I get some work on the next one?!?!
Reply
:iconmaster-ninjabear:
master-ninjabear Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
I still need cover art for Banshee's Wail, what do you charge and how high is your nitpicking tolerance?
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Professional General Artist
Drop me a note and we can discuss.
Reply
:iconcolourbrand:
Colourbrand Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Think this sounds a great idea!

All it needs is someone in Hollywood to do it.

After all, someone did Iron Sky!!
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Well this wouldn't be tongue in cheek like I.S.
Reply
:iconcolourbrand:
Colourbrand Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Is it? Never seen the film but it got made.

I meant alternate Nazi timeline films seldom if ever get made - unless its in Star Trek!
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Professional General Artist
Yeah, Iron Sky is a comedy. It seems to me that we have seen some alternate WW2 history films, but I can't think of them at the moment. Certainly it's an appealing playground for "what if-ers" :)
Reply
:iconcolourbrand:
Colourbrand Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Really? F*** me!

Hmm I think most do not touch it because the idea of the Nazi's even smelling victory turns stomachs...:O
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Professional General Artist
Well at the risk of ruining the novel, the Nazi's STILL don't win ;)  We just find a new and unexpected way to beat 'em!
Reply
:iconcolourbrand:
Colourbrand Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
As it should be :)
Reply
:iconbartlebooth:
Bartlebooth Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I had never heard of Silbervogel before, but - being a huge fan of alternate history - it means Instant Buy for me, bro.
Reply
:icontommerch:
tommerch Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Shout-out to Worcester (pronounced "Wusta")!  Woo-hoo!

Thos. Merchant
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
I thought it was "Wistah"?
Reply
:icontommerch:
tommerch Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Nah. It needs to be a little more slack-jawed, like the natives.  :D (Big Grin) 
Reply
:icondana-redde:
dana-redde Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
As a Worcester native, I'd say both are correct. In my experience, the really hardcore lived-in-Worcester-their-whole-lives types say it more like "Wistah," but so long as you don't over-emphasize the "wuss" sound, Wustah works, too.

I've spent a lot of time thinking about this lol
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Professional General Artist
WOO-HOO! I win!!!!!!
Reply
:iconmad-geo:
Mad-Geo Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2014
Have you ever read a book called The Daleth Effect? IIRC, someone turns an old sub into a spaceship.
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Nope. Any good?
Reply
:iconmad-geo:
Mad-Geo Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014
I remember enjoying it, but I must admit I was much younger then.
Reply
:iconthecentipede:
TheCentipede Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Well... there [i]is[/i] the little problem of the super-pointy nose on the Silbervogel and how that would tend to melt right off in hypersonic flight.
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Even if it was made from titanium (which the German's did have access to in WW2)?
Reply
:iconthecentipede:
TheCentipede Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Very much so. Hypersonic heating due to shock wave impingement caused quite a bit of damage to the X-15's wings and control surfaces; that's why hypersonic vehicles nowadays are always blunt in some form: the rounded noses of rocket fairings, the blunt nose of the shuttle, the flat curved surface of modern waverider concepts... the idea is to get the shock wave to occur off the surface due to air compression in front of the flat or rounded plate (an oblique shock) rather than occur when the structure pierces the free airflow (an attached shock). The heat transfer in such an oblique shock is only radiative, while an attached shock allows for convective heat transfer between the plasma layer and the structure. If that structure's not immediately backed up by a cooling system or a heat sink, then it's quickly going to reach its heat capacity and start melting or breaking down.

(This is also why modern hypersonic vehicles tend to follow the surfboard principle; by closely integrating the propulsion with the rest of the structure there are no nacelles to generate shock waves to impinge on anything. Skylon doesn't look like that, but it's British and planning on using open-cycle active cooling anyway by using fuel lines to turn the fuel tanks into a heat sink that then gets dumped through the engine.)

All this being said, high-temperature nickel-titanium alloys are effective heat-shielding structures (usually if actively cooled). There's no way to effectively cool a sharp point, however, and the sharp point is going to degrade from direct shock impingement and probably lead to vehicle loss. This all came about because no one really knew anything about rarified gas dynamics at the time and since pointy noses are good in supersonic flight (and to some degree in subsonic flight), they could only be better in hypersonic flight.
Reply
:icontaka67:
Taka67 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2014
I thought there were Nazi UFO's based on the moon. :o
Hehe, "Iron Sky" was a hoot.
Reply
:iconrob-caswell:
Rob-Caswell Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2014  Professional General Artist
Yeah, a fun film fer sure.
Reply
:iconsomemuttupnorth:
SomemuttupNorth Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2014
Sounds really interesting! I read all three of Steele's Coyote series and loved that, may need to give this a look!
Reply
Add a Comment: